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a debt and deficit problem and we need to take it very seriously. the fact is that the vast majority of our problem is related to the cost of health care in america. now the debate over obama care is over, we should start to think seriously of how to get america's health care costs under control. as it turns out a book and magazine story provide ways to think of this. the central debate between republicans and democrats is over whether the free market works well in health care. in a new book catastrophic care, they make the case arguing people need ito become consumers of health care so they, not insurance companies or the government, actually see, feel and pay the bill. that will force producers of health care, doctors and hospitals to push down prices and drive up quality. that's what happens with groceries, tv sets or computers. and basic surgery has seen a 90% drop in price and increase in quality since it was introduced in the '90s. that's what happens when consumers pay for a product. steven makes the opposite case in a recover story in "time" magazine. he painstakingly went th
's this job that has seen the deficit come down by a third since he became chancellor. and private sector jobs. he's cutting the country out of a whole we were left in by the party opposite. [cheering and applause] [inaudible] >> the prime minister welcome. the country's first local enterprise fund people who care have raised 400,000 pounds to invest in businesses and encouraging enterprise securing employment and in so many others where they lead the rest of the country -- [inaudible] i'm sure my friend is right about that the leadership of all things. he makes an important point, need to see more small businesses start, more enterprise. we need to see more to keep the private sector going. >> alex cunningham. >> rising unemployment remains an issue in my constituency. based on the reemployment and recession which claims hard working families in the most vulnerable for the obscene tax for millionaires. [cheering and applause] -- looks at the figures today he'll see there are 131,000 more people in work over the last quarter, we have seen 600,000 more people employed compared with a year ago,
level. secondarily, if you say deficit reduction, the partisan are leeched out. we are talking about whether it will work to balance the budget. if along the way 35 million become uninsured, that's sad but we don't talk about it because cbo didn't mention it in the score. that's the great trick of paul ryan to recognize if you only talk about budget deficit, where does your budget put the deficit 20, 30 years from now, the amount of things you sneak in under that cloak that you can never put into the conversation in a serious way in normal times is tremendous. that's the central political innovation of his career. >> the favorite thing in the accounting discussion is compare the government to a family, saying you couldn't -- well, families do run debt, they cannot afford to buy their houses for cash, so they have a thing called a mortgage, which is the national debt of the family in effect. they try to oversimplify everything in this, but is there some break through in this point of republicans saying you know what, the debt isn't such a serious problem? >> there's no break through.
through a state where wisconsin had faced a multibillion dollar budget deficit, we were having double-digit tax increases, and we saw some of the record job loss that we've seen in the past. so what did we do? we came in and took that deficit, $3.6 billion, and today it's nearly half a billion dollar surplus. we took up -- [applause] we took a state where taxes had gone up, and we not only lowered the overall tax burden for the first time in years, property taxes on a median value home had gone town in each of the last two years. [applause] and when it comes, and when it comes to jobs under my predecessor's term, wisconsin had lost 133,000 jobs, and back in 2010 a survey showed just 10% of our employers thought we were headed in the right direction. today we're gaining jobs and 93% of our employers say wisconsin is heading in the right direction. we can lead with an optimistic message. [applause] simply put, we showed in our election that when people realized the debate was between who do you want in charge, the big government special interests n this case the employee unions, or do y
and bennett, the head of this new party on the right. it's unclear to me, i think you have a knowledge deficit that you didn't have the last time around. when you had someone with barak's experience, begin's experience, all these guys are gone. and the question is, does that mean the wheels, the brakes have come off the train? and that now it's more of a runaway car? or are you saying, no, not at all. livni might be there, and there'll be people who might not have the same amount of years of experience, but are maybe counterpoints to some of the other forces. so what's unclear to me yet is to what extent that forum that netanyahu relied upon, how central is that going to be? what is going to mean the loss of that knowledge, that deficit of experience? but i do think for the key factor, he definitely sees that his goal is that israel just be a normal western country, that the middle class have a better quality of life. sounds very familiar to people here. but he has said that the road to that is dealing with palestinian issue. not dividing jerusalem, but everything else. we've got to work this
trillion in new taxes. the government would still be in a deficit after ten years. senator patty murray argues the plan creates jobs and economic growth but, of course, during the process, patience did run thin. >> madam president, madam president, madam president. >> senate will come to order. >> madam president, the senate is not in order. i flow's a lot of march madness going on. we would like to keep it calm on the floor so that senators can be heard. >> reporter: the white house recently passed -- excuse me, the house recently passed the ryan budget plan which includes a $4.6 trillion deficit reduction over the next decade. these budget plans are resolutions are not bills. this week, congress did pass a continuing resolution bill which actually funds the government for the next six months. we did hear from white house press secretary jay carney, responding to today's news in a statement and reading, in part, "like the president's plan, the senate budget cuts wasteful spending, makes tough choices to strengthen entitlements and eliminates special tax breaks and loopholes for the wea
and the cabinet on performance related pay? this has seen the deficit come down by a third since he became chancellor and has seen over one million private sector jobs. he is getting the country out of the hole we are left in by the party opposite. >> speaker, will the prime minister welcomed the inception of the country's first local enterprise fund, were people have raised 400,000 pounds to invest in business albert -- efforts and securing employment? will he agree with me that in this respect, as in so many others, where bedford leaves -- leads the rest of the country follows. >> my honorable friend is right. he makes important points, which is that we do need to see more enterprise and have seen in britain over the last three years the fastest rate of new business creation in our history. but we need to see more of it to keep the private sector going. >> rising unemployment remains an issue in my stockton constituency. are-working families paying for the next months of seen a tax cut for millionaires. >> if the honorable gentleman looks at the figures today he will see that there are 1
. i think you have a knowledge deficit that you did not have the last time around. these three guys are gone, and the question is, does that mean the brakes have come off the train? now it is more of a runaway car? you say no, lapid is there. people who may not have the same experience, but maybe our counterpoints to some of the other forces. what is unclear to me yet is to what extent that for rum -- forum, how central is that going to be? what will that knowledge and deficit of experience mean? he definitely sees that his goal is that israel be a normal country than the middle class has a better quality of life, it sounds familiar to people here. the road to that is dealing with the palestinian issue. everything has to work this out. i don't know what that means. and it gave an interview and was quoted, when the reporter asked him about iran, he said, i have no clue. this is a guy on the inner sanctum of israel. he says, i have no clue. i just wonder how this constellation is going to configure itself. i would hope that a lot of time, the foreign diplomats, whether it is in europ
, immigration and guns and what to do about the deficit. >> don't forget two other prominent spokes people, the president and vice president. they care a lot about it and have been quiet of late. i expect to see a big push between of two of them before the vote. >> the lack of courage in the united states is asstountounast. >> it's amazing. >> no one is coming to take your gun. no one is coming to take your gun. >> it's amazing. it's amazing. when you look at the fact that we are talking about a simple thing like background checks. people are dying every day. a baby killed in -- >> in pennsylvania. >> in brunswick, georgia. we are arguing about background checks is almost ununbelievable. surreal. >> background checks have 90% of support among the american people last check. >>> senator bob casey of pennsylvania will join us on the set coming up and leigh gallagher and representative rick mulvaney will weigh in. our good friend michael hainey will have a preview of the "gq" magazine. bill karins, what is up? >> schoolhouse are cancelled around baltimore and washington, d.c. a lot of delays.
and deficit thing. another is that i think the republican party has to make clear what its foreign policy is. it has had two wars for the past 12 years, people are still settling in and thinking, the voters have said, we don't like that. we're not for that. the republican party has to make clear what it stands for and it is going to have a little bit of debate to get there. those two big things and the policies that spring from them will make all of the difference, so will an eventual compelling presidential candidate. somebody who is involved right now. at the end of the day, it's the candidates who resolve a lot of unresolved things by taking a stand and speaking forcefully for it. >> that was bill clinton after walter mondale lost it. after jimmy carter lost. we had a dynamic governor who was reformed minded and brought those issues into the national forefront. he really helped recharge the democratic party. you know, the republican party is out to lunch. i watched cpac, karl. karl was a former friend. >> i thought i was a current friend? >> you're always a friend, you owe me some chili.
they trust on spending issues. when asked how our budget deficit should be reduced, a large majority, 65% of people said by cutting spending. when asked to choose between the budgets proposed by each party, most people pick the one more in line with the republican proposal. cutting spending and not raising taxes. but when asked when each party was trusted more, people say that they trust the democrats more. go figure. let's get an amp explanation from charlie hearst, economists at the washington times. so you have this. people seem to like the republican approach. they just don't like the republican label with it. why is that? >> i think a large degree, republicans have been snakepit. largely because of what we have seen over the last couple of years. republicans talking to the media, which is something the democrats have focused on more than anything else. including the ideas that republicans have gone four. voters are far more in line with those ideas. but i would actually argue that republicans least realize that there is a problem here and there is a real disconnect between washingto
and iraq were fought as quote emergencies, which means they weren't included in the annual deficits. so, now, when they're talking about a budget that cuts student loan programs for gi members, people coming back from iraq and afghanistan now they're not getting their student loans. because this was all fought off budget. i think that's political malpractice on the part of the republican party. they should have budgeted for this. >> well, from a congressional physician of the soul like diana degette, thank you so much. now to dr. james peterson, msnbc analyst and director of africana st studies. professor, millions oppose the war, but as you know, and i'm sure you remember, their voices were significantly marginalized. give us a sense of how that happened. >> there's a lot of context here. we have to start with the fact that the sort of american ethos in response to 9/11 was a sort of patriotism, people not in line with the government and a very war hawkish administration seemed to be anti-american. so in that environment, the voices that were speaking out against this war, but in that
struggling? economists point to concern about the debt and deficit. uncertain effects of the obamacare. especially the weight of tax increases. >> it's negative for economic growth overtime. global economy, we compete, with many other nations. part of the competition is taxes. >> conservative critics argue big government fools itself to thinking taxing and spend willing make the economy grow. >> it assumes you take money from the economy right pocket and put in the left pocket and manualicly you more money. >> administration defenders, though, look at it differently. >> under normal circumstances, you don't want the government intervening. in the circumstances where we have the weak demand this is a good time for the government to step in. >> even though who want to spend less would increase spending at lower rate. >> bret: house lawmakers vote down budget proposals as an alternative to g.o.p. plan put forward by paul ryan. senators approved a stop gap spending plan. continuing resolution to keep the government funded after the end of the month. senate has, now it heads to the house. a
saying we want a lot more spending, most of it paid for by deficit this year and next. we'll see a lot of defectses from the democrat budget resolution. we saw a vote yesterday in the senate which was, you talked with stuart varney about. repealing the medical device tax. we're likely to see a lot of defects from the white house and the democratic leadership proposal to have a lot more spending in year and coming years. we saw the opening mark of that yesterday. bill: peter cottontail still on the schedule for the 1st of april. we'll bring you back and we'll continue this little discussion about what's right and what's not given the budget crunch. >> bring back the white house tours. bring back the white house tours. bring back the white house tours. there we go. bill: enjoy austin. see you soon. heather. heather: the clock is ticking as the country is on a verge of collapse. can a deal be reached before there is a i had on people's bank accounts and is this something we could see happen to your bank account? bill: also a scared homeowner, well, you won't believe what they did when a h
a knowledge deficit you didn't have the last time around. you someone with obama's experience. all of these three guys are gone. the question is, does that mean that the wheels, the brakes have come off the train? and that now it's more of a runway car? or you say, no, not at all. it might be there. and there will be people who might not have the same amount of yearns of experience -- years of experience but are counter point to the others. it's unclear to me yet to what extend the forum, the netanyahu relied upon, how is that going to be? what is it to mean the knowledge of the deficit of experience? but i do think from what -- the key factor he definitely sees that his goal is israel be a normal western country. the middle class has a better quality of life. but he said that the road to that is dealing with the pam issue -- palestinian issue. everything else you have to work it out. i don't know though you know what that means. you have bennett gave an interview or somewhere quoted in an column when a reporter asked him about it he said i have no clue. it's guy on the inner circl
're going to see the debt and deficit dwindle massively. let's talk about the contest in which dr. carson were speaking, if were talking about the debt and the policy prescriptions of the democrats and the obama administration then he needs to present a counter argument. he needs to present a vision for america that goes against that and he's fnot doing that, he's condemning and criticizing the president's motives, and by insinuation. >> that's absolutely not true. and in fact-- >> disrespectful for the office. >> first of all, he's not run for office. he's not doing this to seek political power, he loves this country. and number one. number two, you mentioned the debt, megyn, this president by the time he leaves office and reelected and we can all agree it that would have added more to the debt than all of his predecessors, including the much maligned george w. bush combined. he had no pro growth, and doesn't protect the balance and the president is delinquent by two months presenting a budget. en you're making your assessment at 5% growth and we have government spending at 25% of gdp. t
, thankfully. >>> facing a $1 billion deficit, chicago public school system is making some really big changes. ceo barbara byrd bennett says the district's underutilized skols will be closed. they have not said how many schools are expected to close but opponents say they unfairly target minorities. >>> 24 and counting for the miami heat. but it was not easy. it hasn't been easy the last few games. lebron james and company came back from 27 points down in the third. >> can you believe that? >> beat his old team, the cleveland cavaliers 98-95. a triple-double. 12 boards, 10 assists. the heat are now within nine games of the nba record for consecutive wins held by the '71-'72 los angeles lakers. >> do you think they'll do it? >> no. they almost blew it against the celtics, almost blew it against the cavs. they are the best team i've seen in years. i don't think they should ever lose necessarily but that's a lot of games to win in a row. >> i can't believe they were down that much and came back. >> i can't believe you can do that every night. >> i think they're doing it on purpose. >>> recovered
in the leadership, which is the deficit of trust between the two sides. but pulling back, they picture, wolf, many israeli critics of the president have said too often he lectures israelis and doesn't seem to understand israel. tonight those critics, man of them, are saying he now feels he has conveyed that he does understand israel in a deep personal way, wolf. >> jessica yellin traveling with the president in jerusalem getting ready to head over to jordan with him tomorrow. jessica, thanks. >>> we're getting new information about claims that syria has used chemical weapons. our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, has the very early results of the u.s. investigation. what is this, barbara? what are we hearing? >> brianna, as you said, the u.s. intelligence community has been working on this problem around the clock. did the syrian regime use chemical weapons. we do now have some initial results of that investigation. with video of syrians suffering from convulsions and breathing problems, and accusations of chemical weapons attacks, u.s. intelligence agencies have scrambled to determine if the
project 1 billion dollar deficit next year. the closures will save chicago $560 million the next decade. >> whether you do this, mike, in chamucla, florida, or chicago, illinois, this is always excruciating tough for parents and kids, but you got to do it if you're going to keep the budget. >> you have to do it to same some semblance of sanity for a big city like that but you get into where are the displaced kids going to go to schools when the schools are closed? are they going to be bussed? most parents would like their kids to go to a neighborhood school and what happens then? that a huge burden for the mayor now. >> totally. sequestration is complicating it even more. we just did a report that head start across the country is facing these exact challenges and cutting school days and not accepting kids and randomly dropping kids from the program and a disadvantage for kids in that economic status. >> you look at the regional and local papers across the country you see endless stories like this. you look at the national programs and turn on the tv news and where is the white house tou
should be used to tackle the deficit and invest in the middle class, not be used just to simply tax, cut tax rates for the rich the way that the house budget did. >> reporter: now the senate did not accept the paul ryan house budget. the patty murray budget, the senate plan will probably come up to a vote 2:00 a.m. or so. uma: 2:00 a.m. regardless how votes will go won't there be need for serious negotiations? >> reporter: no question about that the house has a very different version than the senate. the house said they would balance the budget without raising taxes. the senate is doing more spending, more taxes. so our colleague greta van susteren asked house budget chair paul ryan about next steps. >> house passed the budget. the senate is passing a budget first time we've seen that in four years. that's a good thing. the question is now can we start looking for common ground? can we started a advancing toward a compromise? the way we look at this as house republicans. we understand our budget probably won't become law in every great detail but hopefully we get a down payment on this p
for this in more ways than one. you think about the deficit, the government doesn't have this kind of cash and people are concerned this isn't necessarily the best use of taxpayer money. in the video, you saw a second ago, people are dressed up as crew members on a starship enterprise, and the government employee version of characters claiming they will boldly go where no government employees have ever gone before. it is funny. but i watched the videos with my producer and we were trying to to figure out the training value and people have similar questions. >> i have been since corrected and am about to burst into a fit of giggles and i inappropriately said it is "gilligan's island," not whatever i said. what is the irs saying about this in. >> they came up with this statement saying it is -- i'm quoting now, no mistaking this video does not reflect the best stewardship of resources, and that video of this type will not be made today. so the irs does say training gener videos in general are cheaper. that would involve some travel. >> okay. zain asher, thank you. >>> honeymoons, they are th
. that's how many chicago schools will be closed because a $1 billion budget deficit. it's not clear how many teachers are lose their jobs, but they will close a bunch of schools. 43,000. that's how many jobs have been lost since j.c. penney -- at j.c. penney since ron johnson became ceo. a new report shows he let the company pay for at least nine executives to get work by two jets, which cost $41 million apiece. nice work if you can get it. mr. kilmeade? >> brian: or if you had it. it's one of the most outrageous stories of the week. one of the most popular pharmacies telling their employees to step on the scale or pay a penalty. cvs wants employees to report their weight, fat and glucose levels to health insurance bosses and if they don't, they get fined $600 a year. it might be legal, but is it fair? steven mitchell is an employment attorney and author of a book, "the employee rights handbook." and john is a professor at a law school. does this sound right to you? >> it's an outrage n my opinion. they're trying to help people's health, but when you impose a penalty on people, that's w
of a communication ability to translate that is a significant deficit. for highly uncommon events such as an asteroid fly-by, there's simply no established communication mechanism. i believe our flight operations team learned of da-14 when they received a courtesy call from a colleague at the aerospace corporation. last year the commercial satellite industry participated in dod's war games designed to exercise dod thinking about the deployment of its terrestrial and space assets in response to a conflict situation. last year those games concluded, as they have several times in the past, that dod relies on commercial satellite companies -- their reliance is considerable and that a crisis is the wrong time to try to establish clear lines of communication with your major partners and suppliers. i suspect the same conclusion can be safely applied to the topics that we're discussing today. while governments were first to send satellites to near-earth space, commercial enterprise will be the primary use of the orbital arc in the 21st century. government and space operators need to take a more collaborative
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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